I: Inside Job (2010)

Inside Job 1

Charles Ferguson is no stranger to provoking controversy with his often in-depth documentary coverage. Previously detailing the Bush Administration’s collapsing regime in post-war Iraq with his revealing and often shocking film “No End in Sight” (2007), Ferguson cultivated an image of almost intimidatory scholarship by conducting interviews of those who appear as unwilling or suspicion of talking to Ferguson who sits behind the camera. This skill has not only allowed his audience to become witnesses to attempted deception on screen despite the presence of known facts; it has also made Ferguson a force not to be reckoned with after winning the Academy award for best Documentary in 2011.

Inside Job explains the ins and outs of the 2008 global banking crisis, an economic catastrophe that has affected every corner of the globe. With a surprising, yet professional, narration from Matt Damon the tricks and stratagems that the worlds leading banks used to help create the meltdown are given everything a first-timer of global economics could want. Johnathan Gershon has done a magnificent job at creating Inside Job‘s many graphics of statistical charts, business financials and many many more elements that all come to light with Ferguson’s writing style.

But what of the topic itself? Job scathingly unearths the biggest beneficiaries and guilty parties of the crisis by managing to get as many people as possible in front of the camera. The people who accepted to be interviewed for the film that is. Ferguson’s quick replies to those who inaccurately describe or explain certain events is a joy to watch on screen. Although some lament and regret the actions of themselves or others it is those who attempt to put up a fight that decapitate you further into wanting to know why the crash happened.

For Ferguson, Inside Job is lightning striking twice. No End in Sight‘s overall objective was to deplore the inexcusable Bush administration and its failings in trying to rebuild Iraq. Here, his efforts are joined by the global collective of those who have suffered because of the richest 1%’s actions. The documentary not only seeks for the faltering guilty party at hand to receive justice, but makes an honest effort in attempting to understand the reasoning of why in went on not just on Wall Street but in Europe, Asia and the rest of the world. With the current economic crisis in the EU still underway after over five years it is difficult to see Inside Job‘s relevance leaving just quite yet, but Ferguson’s overall message is not one of hope for change after learning from the mistakes of the past. It instead simply presents the facts to us in a form we would inevitably call “human nature”.

Frank Partnoy: You're gonna make an extra $2 million a year, or $10 million a year for putting your financial institution at risk. Someone else pays the bill, you don't. Would you make that bet? Most people on Wall Street said, 'Sure, I'd make that bet.'

Frank Partnoy: You’re gonna make an extra $2 million a year, or $10 million a year for putting your financial institution at risk. Someone else pays the bill, you don’t. Would you make that bet? Most people on Wall Street said, ‘Sure, I’d make that bet.

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